A New Year Of Resolution. Little Promises To Save Big Money.

Every year after Christmas, I seem to acquire the January blues. I suspect this is due to the trepidation I feel at the thought of opening my credit card bills. It’s also that time of the year again where I feel inspired to make some financially beneficial resolutions. These promises indeed take disciple and dedication, but the rewards will most certainly prevail if I can just find the perseverance. Feel free to take inspiration from my New Year vows…

Starting with Christmas. I know it was only a little over a week ago, but when better to begin shopping than boxing day? All the toys I paid an arm and leg for before the 25th, were merrily dancing in the shop window for the price of a plum pudding. Same as the wrapping paper, cards, and tinsel. I now have my decorations, the kid’s Barbie dolls and monster trucks prepped in time for next December, for $20 bucks. With that in mind, there are also various sales throughout the year to keep track of. For more expensive gifts, the end of the financial year sales in June/July are amazing for electronics, gadgets and appliances. And after a few months of scouring markets, second hand shops and genuine sales, I should be prepared for Christmas by August. It’s a pity that we can’t stock up on food for the end of the year, but that’s what beginning a Christmas Club is for, I’ve decided. Starting from January, placing around $10 a week in a special fund will earn me over $400 bucks next festive season – that’s a lot of turkey and alcohol, with some spare cash to hit the boxing day sales, of course…

I will get my financial affairs in order. Interest rates are at a jaw-dropping low, so it may be time to look at refinancing. This is especially attractive if you’re by chance paying lots of mortgage for a no deposit, full-finance loan. Remember, banks want to give you money, so if you’re paying a lot more than the lowest rate, shop around for takers to offer you a better deal. Almost every financial institution will even pay out any penalty fees just for the privilege of having you as a new customer. I will also stop paying too much in insurance, and bundle my car, house, contents and life insurance together. It can most certainly be done, and possibly reduce my current payments by 40%. From searching the net, I found there are insurance companies, such as Youi, who only cost $300 a year for car coverage, if you only drive 3000 kilometres a year – as opposed to the $1,200 I pay at the moment.

I will finally create the hobby farm I’ve been dreaming of, or a vegetable patch at least. After researching around a bit, I spoke to Godings agricultural machinery , who have been supplying farms for over forty years. The advice they gave me made my head spin and my wallet dance. Hobby farms are becoming a culture that hundreds of people are utilizing every year – even in the suburbs. Having a chicken or two means fresh eggs each week. Then there’s carrots, pumpkin, tomatoes, salad greens, herbs, and all the things I’ll never pay for in a supermarket again – ever! Not to mention the fact that I’m human, and care about the planet I reside on. Growing your own produce is an environmentally responsible contribution.

And Lastly, I will… Download Skype, so I’m not paying for mobile calls. Go out less and invite people over instead. Only take cash with me when I do go out, and leave my plastic at home – it’s amazing how much more money I seem to have when I’m drunk. Start a coin jar. Direct debit my bills weekly to avoid late fees. Make lunch and take it to work. Compare bargains on the internet. Take public transport to work. Borrow books from the library instead of buying them. Invest in a filter and bottle tap water.
And clearly, buy a yacht once my savings skyrocket. I promise.