Pacific Rim Soundtrack

German-born film composer Ramon Djawadi has been tapped to write music for the Pacific Rim soundtrack. He was specifically chosen because of his outstanding work on the first Iron Man movie and the HBO series Game of Thrones. He is also well-known for his scores on the TV series Prison Break and Person of Interest. A summa cum laude graduate of Berklee College of Music, Djawadi worked with Hans Zimmer and Klaus Badelt before striking out on his own with the film Blade:Trinity. He went on to score the animated film Open Season as well as its sequel. Other notable movies he scored are Safe House, Clash of the Titans, The Unborn and Deception. He also created music for the video games Shift 2: Unleashed and Medal of Honor: Warfighter.

Director Guillermo Del Toro has said during an interview with collider.com that Pacific Rim will also be featuring Russian rap music.

About The Movie
Pacific Rim is a futuristic man vs monsters movie. Directed by Guillermo Del Toro from a screenplay by Travis Beacham, the film centers on the massive war between human-controlled robots called Jaegers and legions of monstrous creatures called Kaiju who mysteriously emerge from the bottom of the sea. On the verge of being defeated, mankind finds two unlikely heroes in a former pilot and an untested trainee. The two become the planet earth’s last hope in defeating the seemingly invincible Kaiju. The two unlikely heroes are played by Charlie Hunnam and Rinko Kikuchi. Other members of the cast are Idris Elba, Charlie Day, Clifton Collins Jr., Ron Perlman and Max Martini.

Pacific Rim Trivia
1. Tom Cruise was considered for a key role in the film. He was eventually replaced by Idris Elba.
2. A graphic novel which covers what happened before the events in the film is in the works.
3. Director Del Toro has hinted that he might do a sequel depending on how things will play out for the first release.Tom Cruise was considered for a key role in the film. He was eventually replaced by Idris Elba.
4. Kaiju is the term used by the Japanese for ‘giant monster’.