Painting a Picture of Merton with Numbers

Painting a Picture of Merton with NumbersWhether you’re new to the area or have resided in Merton for many years, do you know all there is to know about this South West London Borough? Want to know a bit more? Then stay tuned because we’re going to share some interesting figures, facts and Merton statistics.

  • Painting a Picture of Merton with NumbersFormed in 1965 under the London Government Act of 1963, the Borough of Merton was a merging of the Municipal Borough of Mitcham, the Municipal Borough of Wimbledon, and the Merton and Morden Urban District
  • Total area is 14.52 square miles, or just over 37 kilometres
  • Total population, as of the 2011 census, is 200,500
  • Telephone area code is 020
  • Postcodes include CT, KT, SM and SW
  • The main local paper was founded in 1977 by a former Conservative Councillor in the Borough’s Council
  • Painting a Picture of Merton with NumbersMore than 500,000 visitors attend the annual Wimbledon Tennis Championships, and the event takes place over two weekends at the end of June, and the beginning of July
  • The Championships require more than 6,000 staff to keep the ball rolling, from umpires to ball boys and girls
  • The largest mosque in western Europe was opened in Morden in 2003 – it can accommodate 10,000 people and cost £5.5 million to build, that was donated by the Ahmadiyya Community
  • Merton has been active since prehistoric times
  • Long before the current residents, it was enjoyed by Celtic Warriors
  • There are remnants of an Iron Age fort to the southwest of Wimbledon Common windmill
  • 500 years before Julius Caesar was born there was a fortified village on Wimbledon Common, that is now known as Caesar’s camp
  • The Romans invaded in AD 43, and started building an important road right through the Borough
  • When the Roman empire collapsed in AD 410 Germanic Anglo-Saxons quickly replaced the Roman settlers
  • In 1801 Admiral Lord Nelson moved into Merton Place House, where he continued to reside until his death in 1805
  • William Morris, famous for being the founder of the Arts and Crafts Movement, opened a factory in Merton Abbey in 1881.
  • 1798 saw a duel on Wimbledon Common between Prime Minister William Pitt and the MP for Southwark – both duelists missed their target
  • The All England Croquet Club was founded in Worple Road in 1868
  • In 1877 the name was changed to the All England Croquet and Lawn Tennis Club
  • In 1906 and 1907 trams came to Mitcham and Wimbledon
  • By 1926 the London Underground had reached Colliers Wood, South Wimbledon and Morden
  • Within 30 years the improved transport increased a small farming community of 1,000 into a residential suburb with a population of almost 13,000
  • The Merton of today was formed with the emergence of 5 new town centres: Colliers Wood, Mitcham, Morden, Raynes Park and Wimbledon
  • People have been playing cricket on Mitcham cricket ground since 1690
  • Painting a Picture of Merton with NumbersThe first Buddhist temple in the UK can be found in Wimbledon, and is called the Buddhapadipa Temple
  • Merton ranks 146 in the Mirror’s Crime Database for 6 month average crime figures – with a crime rate of 3.99 per 100 residents
  • Merton is one of the most densely populated Outer London Boroughs
  • Merton enjoys almost twice as much open space compared to the average of other London boroughs
  • The famous Regent Street store Liberty’s, was once supplied with silk-printing by the textile mills at Merton Abbey – now the site of a cultural visitors centre
  • Wimbledon Common is protected by law (Wimbledon and Putney Commons Act of 1871) from being enclosed or built upon
  • Wimbledon Greyhound Stadium is the largest and most successful dog racing track in the country
  • The dog racing track has a circumference of 408 metres, and races range between 252 and 1068 metres, with races taking place every 15 minutes
  • According to an Annual Population Survey Merton has the happiest residents in London
  • Merton has a very low number of homeless households, and consequently a low number of households in temporary accommodation

Overall, Merton is a pretty fine Borough to live in. Hope every fact you were interested in got covered. And since this is a Merton dedicated article, here are some useful websites to help you if you actually live there:

Merton Council

Merton Community School District

Merton Citizen Advice Bureau

Gutter Cleaning in Merton

Age UK Merton

Merton Medical