Rehabilitation after Hip Replacement Surgery

Rehabilitation after Hip Replacement Surgery

Rehab is the key to success after hip replacement surgery and Scottsdale hip replacement can assist in the process. Rehabilitation, which consists of exercises and stretching done at home or in a rehabilitation facility, is an essential step to getting your range of motion back after joint replacement surgery. And the good news is it typically only takes an hour or less, three to five days a week for about 12 weeks, provided you stick to the regimen and don’t overtax yourself.

The timeline for knee rehab goes something like this: A few hours after surgery, hospital staff helps you take a few steps on your own. On day two, physical therapists in the hospital start working with your range of motion, and most patients are cleared to go home and start rehab work there within two to four days. (If you have stairs in your home, hospital therapists will make sure you can walk them on your own before they release you.) If you choose home rehab, a physical therapist will make daily visits to help you bend and straighten the knee and do mild strengthening exercises, which get easier as the pain and swelling subside. The goal is to be strong enough to get to an outpatient rehab facility on your own to continue the work. Within three months of surgery, most patients can engage in daily activities with little to no pain.

Most joint replacement surgeries are successful, and post-surgery problems like infection, blood clots, and dislocation are generally treatable. However your risk of complications may rise if you have immune-weakening conditions like heart or kidney disease or if you have an unhealthy lifestyle. Generally speaking complication rates are three to five times higher for people who smoke. Obesity complications rates are approximately six to seven times higher making it necessary for patients to be proactive about preventing infection. Any infection you get post-surgery, even if its ten years post-surgery puts your new joint as risk, which means you need to fight infections at the first sign.

Joint replacements typically last for 15 to 20 years. Unfortunately, joint replacements aren’t a forever solution, but if you maintain a healthy lifestyle and get annual check-ups to monitor the new joint, it should last you at least 15 years, if not 20. Realistic expectations are another important aspect of joint replacement success. It’s a lifestyle change and once you get a replacement, running, jumping, and high-impact activities are limited, if not cut out, to optimize the length of time a replacement will last. If you push to do your old activities too quickly, you will stress the wound. This is a huge surgery and you need to slow down, take your time, and recover at a good pace.