News Tattoo: Why Getting a Tattoo Can Cut Your Throat

Tattoo: Why Getting a Tattoo Can Cut Your Throat

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Getting a tattoo can cut your throat because although body painting has been a part of many cultures around the world for centuries, in comparison tattoos are relatively new to capitalistic, Judeo-Christian, mainstream America. America is a capitalistic, Judeo-Christian society where money, or the loss of money can dictate most if not all of our decisions. This can and should include whether it’s worth getting a tattoo or not. Even though, tattoos are showing up everywhere, including some places we would rather not see them, sometimes they have a negative stigma attached to them. The negative stigma associated with tattoos is in part due to the people that our grandfathers were most familiar with having tattoos. In their day, the people that had tattoos were the exception to the rule like hardcore military types, biker’s, and gang members. These groups were considered fringe groups that were not in step with our capitalistic, Judeo-Christian society. The capitalistic part of our society in the form of big business gets to dictate a dress code to its employees. Tattoos fall under the dress code of many of these companies. If a company’s dress code prohibits visible tattoos like yours, having a tattoo could cause you to miss the opportunity to get a good paying job. Some people recognize business policies like this one as a part of the “Golden Rule of Business” which says, “The one with the gold makes the rules.” This is why getting a tattoo can cut your throat, it can kill your chances of getting a job with certain employers.

Even with the negative history of tattoos, today many people don’t seem to know how getting a tattoo can affect them financially. These days it seems like almost everyone either has a tattoo or has considered getting one. Tattoos are showing up on everybody from doctors and lawyers to soccer moms. They can be found anywhere from the boardroom to the locker room. Some parents are even allowing their children to get in on the act and get tattoos. Thankfully, most children get a temporary rub on tattoo rather than permanent ones. Obviously tattoos have gained wider acceptance than what they experienced in your grandfathers day. But if you look at big business you won’t see visible tattoos in most cases. Obviously your lifestyle and aspirations all play a part in your decision about whether to get a tattoo or not. If you plan to do construction work getting a tattoo may not matter as much as if you plan to become Chief Executive Officer of Acme Sprockets. Even though construction is big business, most construction companies don’t have dress codes that prohibit tattoos. Likewise, if you plan on making a living in the entertainment industry, getting a tattoo may not effect your potential earning as much as some other professions. Some entertainers, like rappers for example, are almost expected to get tattoos. On the other hand, if you have an old-school doctor and/or pastor, they probably don’t have a tattoo. Even though more and more people are getting tattoos, serious consideration needs to be given to how getting a tattoo can cut your throat financially.

Getting a tattoo can cut your throat financially if the company that you’re interested in working for has cultivated an image that your tattoo doesn’t promote. The company wants to promote an image to potential clients that says you can trust us to do what’s in your best interest. Companies aren’t going to let your appearance contradict that and cause the company to lose potential clients and money. Businesses put millions of dollars into marketing campaigns aimed at a target audience that thinks and acts in a certain way and most importantly they buy the products the company sells. If these clients aren’t “tattoo” people, it’s not in the company’s best interest to hire you and your tattoo. A major camera manufacturer once had a television commercial that featured a high profile tennis player that had a line in the commercial where he would say, “Image is everything.” It was a tongue in cheek comment because the tennis player had an image that contradicted the starched white etiquette that professional tennis promoted. The contradiction served to emphasize the importance of image in business. This is a big reason getting a tattoo can cut your throat when it doesn’t promote the company and your professional goals.

Getting a tattoo can cut your throat now even though they’ve gained wider acceptance but what kind of social status will tattoos have in the future? Will the pendulum of public opinion swing the other way and tattoos become taboo once again? What happens when you get older and your beliefs change? Will you be as proud of the tattoo that you got when you were eighteen years old when you’re sixty years old? God forbid you should have a tattoo of Rod, whom you broke up with years ago, on your lower back and now you and Mark want to get married. Of, course you can get it removed but isn’t that a painful experience and a bad memory to be caring around? Getting a tattoo can cut your throat financially but who knows what their future ramification will be.

Getting a tattoo can cut your throat may make it sound like you shouldn’t get a tattoo but that’s not the case at all. You can get a tattoo and have the career you want just by being discreet. All it takes is a little common sense. Most employers that have policies against tattoos don’t want their employees to have tattoos that are visible to the public. So if you get one that’s hidden from public view shouldn’t be a problem. What your employer and the public doesn’t know won’t hurt them. The main thing is that you otherwise conduct yourself in a way that the company and its customers approve of. Getting a tattoo can cut your throat financially if you’re not wise but you can still enjoy having a tattoo just by using a little discretion.

Tattoo: Why Getting a Tattoo Can Cut Your Throat

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Tattoo: Why Getting a Tattoo Can Cut Your Throat
General Contributor
Janice is a writer from Chicago, IL. She created the "simple living as told by me" newsletter with more than 12,000 subscribers about Living Better and is a founder of Seekyt.

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