What To Do When Airline Refuses To Pay Flight Delay Compensation?

Every passenger who flies to and through the EU enjoys a set of rights. The airlines also have a number of responsibilities toward their customers as long as the carrier is an EU registered company. A good amount of these regulations are centred around customer service, focussing on taking you from the starting point to your destination safely and on time. It is, however not always the case and delays, cancellations and overbooking are faced by both airline staff as well as passengers on an almost daily basis.

A flight delay may not seem like much at the outset, but it can lead to a lot of loss in terms of time and money for the passengers. The above mentioned regulations were formed not only to ensure that carriers are always on time, but also to set penalties for delays, when only they are to blame. You as a passenger can file flight delay compensation claims if the delays or cancellations were caused by reasons that could have been controlled by the airline company.

What the airlines need to do

The laws are straightforward and simple, but getting the airline to pay up for its mistakes can be quite tricky. If you approach an airline and notify it that your flight was unnecessarily delayed, it should honour your flight compensation claims and proceed with the repayment procedures. If it rejects your claim right away, without looking into the matter in detail, you can take it up with higher authorities.

If your claims get turned down right away, the airline may try to pass it off stating that the delay was caused by ‘extraordinary circumstances’. While it is true that not all delays are caused by mismanagement, you can always challenge the clause if you feel that it is untrue. Many airlines have been found guilty of slipping off technical snags as extraordinary conditions, but the courts have ruled against it.

Seeking the help of the law

The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), is a watchdog of aspects relating to commercial air travel and you can file a complaint with them. The CAA takes flight compensation claims seriously and can bring down the legal arm on the airline. The regulations are not only clear, but also give a number of examples and exceptions to explain the subject in detail. Completing the procedures may take a lot of time, but the courts have made it clear that every claim, going as far back as six years is eligible for a payout.

Six years will give you enough time to make a full claim, so you can take your time understanding the several aspects related to filing flight compensation claims with the help of a professional. A smart move will be to keep contacting the airline and approach higher authorities if the company refuses to pay or denies your claims. It will help in building a strong case in your favour.