Which is Better – Fish Oil or Krill Oil or Flaxseed Oil?

Fish oils have long been used a great source of omega-3 essential fatty acids. Flaxseed oil too. But there is a relatively new ‘player’ in the field, called krill oil. Krill is only new to the supplement market min you, because it has been used by the Japanese since the nineteenth century, as a food delicacy (okiami).

Flaxseed oil is a good source of omega-3 fats, so is fish oil, but you only need to consume around half the amount of krill oil to get the required amount of omega-3’s. If you don’t like taking large tablets or capsules, this is great news as krill oil ones are really small in comparison.

Plus, your body will only absorb a percentage of the fish oil, whereas the body absorbs all of the krill oil. This gives the body more of what it needs, going a long way towards keeping it functioning normally. Flaxseed oil, although good for health, does not contain anywhere near the same nutritional value as fish oil, or krill oil, relating to omega-3 fats. This is why we strongly advocate the use of krill oil as your number one source of omega-3 essential fatty acids.

What does krill oil contain, that fish oil does not?

We’ve already discussed the actual ‘use’ value of krill oil, in that it gives your body more usable omega-3 fats. Almost zero of a krill oil capsule is wasted in the body. This may be something that you do not know about fish oils, and the way they are produced. Fish oil is derived from the heating with alcohol and another chemical called ester. It takes a long time from putting the fish oil capsule in your mouth, to it passing through the stomach and being absorbed.

Krill oil also contains phospholipids, that are naturally produced in the body (1). They protect the microscopic cells from dissolving in the bloodstream. As you might guess, they are of high importance to your life. Fish oil does not contain phospholipids, neither does it contain choline, like krill does – this nutrient is charged with producing healthy cells in the brain and nervous system.

Studies have shown that choline is crucial learning ability of adults, and it is even more important to the brains of children and un-born babies. This is why we advocate that everyone should have krill oil as part of their daily supplement regime, particularly if they are not eating oil fish like salmon a few times a week.

Here are some safety tips for taking any form of omega-3 essential fats

This is important. Everywhere you read about omega-3 EFA’s, you are told that you need them in your diet because the body does not make them. They are ‘essential’ because without them, the body breaks down healthy cells and will eventually develop some disease, or other. But what you are not told about omega-3’s is that there are specific times when you should not take them! In fact, if you do take them – it could be more harmful to your health, than not taking them.

Let me explain, starting with alcohol. When you drink booze of any kind, your liver does a huge amount of work to purify the toxins. There is a side effect of this process – acetaldehyde, which turns the EPA in krill oil, toxic. The time you should leave between alcohol consumption and taking a high dose of omega-3 is roughly 3 – 4 hours.

Next, is sugar. Fructose sugar to be more precise, which, as your body digests it, heads right to your liver. Your liver can only safely deal with around twenty-five grams of fructose at one time. And while it is digesting the sugar, it is unable to effectively deal with omega-3 fats. The end result is a complete loss of omega-3, because it gets burned as fat – not absorbed by the body in the usual way. It is a good idea to lower your intake of sugary drinks, snacks and desserts when taking krill oil.

Krill is Safer Than Some Fish Oils

The way krill are caught and taken to the marketplace is simplistic and safer than fish oils. They are caught in freezing cold oceans, then spend their entire time at the same temperature until oil production time. This is not the case with fish oils, which is why quality cannot always be guaranteed. Sometimes they are caught in warm waters, and not chilled immediately, could be up to a week according to some sources.

I’ve been taking krill oil to treat hypercoagulation in my blood, for around a year now (2). I did try a few other natural therapies, like fish oils, enzyme treatments and oils, and while some worked well, others were a total waste of my time and money. By far the best solution, for me, was krill oil. I swear by it. I take it every day.

I’m a huge believer in all things natural, which is why I started my website, and a few others which you can find listed on my google plus profile. I don’t believe that doctors offer you the best options sometimes – I’m not sure that because it’s easier to get a prescription pad out of their draw, or worse, they won’t make any money from telling you to try something natural. It’s a sad fact that doctors decisions are now sometimes focused this way, but the pharmaceutical industry really does have a huge say in what we should be taking to cure health problems.

I strongly recommend anyone trying krill oil, because it does provide many healing qualities, but not only that – a daily dose can protect your heart, brain, skin, eyes and has the ability to ‘detoxify’ your body if you need it.

References:

  1. http://biology.about.com/od/molecularbiology/ss/phospholipids.htm
  2. http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/hypercoagulation.html